Markus Spiske, Flickr

Best of Landscape News 2021: People & Rights

Our pick of this year’s top stories

The climate crisis is said to affect everyone, everywhere. In reality, it is the communities that have contributed little to climate change that must bear the brunt of its effects most, all while having fewer resources and means for protection. How is this fair? And how can individuals take a stand to foster environmental justice and rights for all? Read some of Landscape News‘s best stories from this year on the systemic issues responsible for environmental inequality and what people are doing to fight against it.

When home is stolen: stories from the frontlines of climate migration

Increasing numbers of people are forced into migration from climate change – but lack legal protection as refugees

Six months after Typhoon Haiyan hit the Philippines in 2013, its devastating effects were far from reversed. Lesley Wright, UNDP Philippines
Six months after Typhoon Haiyan hit the Philippines in 2013, its devastating effects were far from reversed. Lesley Wright, UNDP Philippines

Why does science need to be more equitable for women?

GLF Live with IPCC vice-chair Ko Barrett


Battle calls from within: 6 Amazonia-led campaigns and networks you should know

From signing declarations to purchasing fair goods, here’s how you can help save the Amazon

Chief Raoni Metukire, one of the most prominent Indigenous Brazilian leaders and activists. Pedro Biondi, Flickr
Chief Raoni Metukire, one of the most prominent Indigenous Brazilian leaders and activists. Pedro Biondi, Flickr

Amazonian preservation rests on political investment, inclusive of Indigenous power

GLF Amazonia Day 3 highlights need to link Amazonian ecological and social systems in policy

As 300 tribos indígenas que vivem no bioma amazônico estão pedindo a proteção legal de 80% do bioma. Christian Braga, Greenpeace
As 300 tribos indígenas que vivem no bioma amazônico estão pedindo a proteção legal de 80% do bioma. Christian Braga, Greenpeace

In Peru, the path to achieving rights of nature winds like the rivers it seeks to protect

A look inside the Indigenous movement fighting for ecosystems to be subjects for state protection

The Marañón river, Peru’s second-longest river and mainstem source of the Amazon River. Indigenous peoples reliant on its waters are fighting for the river to have recognized rights. Ministerio del Ambiente, Flickr
The Marañón river, Peru’s second-longest river and mainstem source of the Amazon River. Indigenous peoples reliant on its waters are fighting for the river to have recognized rights. Ministerio del Ambiente, Flickr

Why does nature need its own rights?

GLF Live with film director Joshua B. Pribanic


The path to a fair future for the “people behind our plates”

4 questions with IFAD president Gilbert F. Houngbo on strategies for rural communities

Landowner Mariama Jarju harvests with her farm workers in Aljamdou village, Gambia. ©IFAD/Nana Kofi Acquah
Landowner Mariama Jarju harvests with her farm workers in Aljamdou village, Gambia. ©IFAD/Nana Kofi Acquah

Article tags

climate justiceenvironmental justicerights

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