Bryce olsen, Unsplash

Best of Landscape News 2021: Biodiversity

Our pick of this year’s top stories

Just as the world is undergoing a climate crisis, an equally critical but less discussed disaster is also unfolding: that of the world’s disappearing biodiversity. The astounding array of life on Earth underpins virtually everything in our lives, from the food we eat to the air we breathe.

Ahead of the UN putting a new global framework for protecting biodiversity into action next year, Landscape News spent some time this year digging into what that should entail. Here is our pick of what we published.

What’s on the horizon for the upcoming Post-2020 Biodiversity Framework

A new global framework to protect the planet’s biodiversity is almost finalized. Will it be more successful than the last one?

A river winding through the tropical forests of Balok, Malaysia. Eutah Mizushima, Unsplash
A river winding through the tropical forests of Balok, Malaysia. Eutah Mizushima, Unsplash

The missing piece of new biodiversity goals? Managed landscapes

Scientists and policymakers stress importance of targeting agricultural landscapes in Post-2020 Global Biodiversity Framework

A Sumatran farmer spreads organic fertilizer on her agroforested farm, to increase soil matter, infiltration and water storage. Tri Saputro, CIFOR
A Sumatran farmer spreads organic fertilizer on her agroforested farm, to increase soil matter, infiltration and water storage. Tri Saputro, CIFOR

Tom Crowther on new platform Restor and biodiversity credits

At COP26, the ecologist speaks on the need for technology in restoration efforts

Ecosystem ecologist Tom Crowther at COP26 in Glasgow. Gabrielle Lipton, Global Landscapes Forum
Ecosystem ecologist Tom Crowther at COP26 in Glasgow. Gabrielle Lipton, Global Landscapes Forum

The endangered dugong: a shy ‘ecosystem engineer’

The legendary sea herbivores support fishing industries and carbon stocks – through their ferocious appetites

A cousin of the manatee, the dugong is a peaceful marine creature found in the Indian and western Pacific Oceans. Dugong Seagrass, Flickr
A cousin of the manatee, the dugong is a peaceful marine creature found in the Indian and western Pacific Oceans. Dugong Seagrass, Flickr

How many people care about biodiversity and nature loss? Hundreds of millions and counting

New Economist Intelligence Unit report measures the global “eco-wakening”

A sea turtle, classified as an endangered species by IUCN, swims in Brazilian waters. Marcos Paulo Prado, Unsplash
A sea turtle, classified as an endangered species by IUCN, swims in Brazilian waters. Marcos Paulo Prado, Unsplash

Saving the monarch butterfly: What can be done?

The decline of the beloved species has triggered action across communities, serving as a gateway to conservation awareness

Few butterfly species are as well known in North America as the monarch butterfly. Erin Minuskin, Unsplash
Few butterfly species are as well known in North America as the monarch butterfly. Erin Minuskin, Unsplash

Elizabeth Mrema’s visions for a new era for nature and women

Three questions with the UN biodiversity agency’s executive director


Environmental organizations issue 7 policy recommendations on biodiversity and One Health

Health, finance and landscape custodians called to the forefront of conservation policy

Illustration by Josie Ford
Illustration by Josie Ford

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